Journal Club 2019

Monday, October 14th, 2019
Mentoring Like Your Plants

Journal Club will be on Monday where Bridget McFarland will be leading the discussion of From deficits to possibilities: Mentoring lessons from plants by Dr. Beronda Montgomery. Dr. Montgomery will be speaking at the PBPG seminar on Friday, October 11.

Monday, October 7th, 2019
The paradox of irrigation efficiency: Higher efficiency rarely reduces water consumption

Journal Club will be on Monday where Stefania Cartoni will be leading the discussion of Combining kura clover with forage legumes and grasses to optimize pasture forage legume content. Please join us!

Monday, September 23rd, 2019
The paradox of irrigation efficiency: Higher efficiency rarely reduces water consumption

Elizabeth McNamee will be leading the discussion of The Paradox of Irrigation Efficiency: Higher Efficiency Rarely Reduces Water Consumption by Grafton et al. (2018). There is a focus by governments and regulatory bodies to increase farmland water use efficiency. However, does increasing efficiency actually lead to less water being used? Feel free to bring you lunch along and join in the discussion!

Monday, September 16th, 2019
Roles of sugars in controlling flowering time

Journal Club will be starting up again next Monday! Nathaniel Schleif will be leading the discussion of Roles of Sugars in Controlling Flowering Time by Cho et al. (2018). No matter your area of plant-related study, bring your lunch and come build some community!

Monday, April 22, 2019
Is the domestication bottleneck a myth?

Join us as Andrew Maule covers the ~spicy~ topic of whether the domestication bottleneck is a myth. Check out the paper here.

Monday, April 8th, 2019
Thriving in graduate school: A mental health discussion

We will be hosting Alecia Sundsmo, Associate Director of Clinical Services of University Health Services, during Journal Club this week. She will be speaking about mental health in graduate school, the campus resources available, and ways to help our students thrive. This meeting will be open to all plant sciences graduate students, faculty, and staff, and lunch will be provided. Sign up here by Friday, April 5.

Thank you to the following groups for co-sponsoring this event: Agronomy Department, Botany Department, Horticulture Department, Plant Breeding and Plant Genetics Program, and Plant Pathology Department.

Monday, March 25th, 2019
Sowing the seeds of skepticism: Russian state news and anti-GMO sentiment

Please join Journal Club on Monday to discuss a paper mentioned at the 2018 Annual Plant Sciences Symposium: Sowing the seeds of skepticism: Russian state news and anti-GMO sentiment by Dorius (2018). Discussion will be led by Raegan Hoefler and will include the paper, other causes of anti-GMO sentiment, and our role as scientists in the debate.

Monday, March 4th, 2019
39 studies about human perception in 30 minutes

Join us on Monday as Amanda Salvi discusses 39 studies about human perception [of data and data visualization].

Monday, February 25th, 2019
No more excuses for non-reproducible methods

Join us on Monday as Nathaniel Schlief discusses some hot takes: Why your Methods section blows! There will also be chips and salsa to pair with the discussion.

Monday, February 18th, 2019
Ileal-lymphoid-nodular hyperplasia, non-specific colitis, and pervasive developmental disorder in children

Join us on Monday as Lily Hislop covers the famously wrong RETRACTED: Ileal-lymphoid-nodular hyperplasia, non-specific colitis, and pervasive developmental disorder in children, or the paper that launched the antivaxxer health crisis.

Monday, February 11, 2019
Estimates of the heritability of human longevity are substantially inflated due to assortative mating

Join us on Monday as Bridget McFarland covers Estimates of the heritability of human longevity are substantially inflated due to assortative mating. Human life span is a phenotype that integrates many aspects of health and environment into a single ultimate quantity: the elapsed time between birth and death. Though it is widely believed that long life runs in families for genetic reasons, estimates of life span “heritability” are consistently low (∼15–30%). Here, we used pedigree data from Ancestry public trees, including hundreds of millions of historical persons, to estimate the heritability of human longevity.

Although “nominal heritability” estimates based on correlations among genetic relatives agreed with prior literature, the majority of that correlation was also captured by correlations among nongenetic (in-law) relatives, suggestive of highly assortative mating around life span-influencing factors (genetic and/or environmental). We used structural equation modeling to account for assortative mating, and concluded that the true heritability of human longevity for birth cohorts across the 1800s and early 1900s was well below 10%, and that it has been generally overestimated due to the effect of assortative mating.

Monday, January 28th, 2019
Applications of machine learning methods to genomic selection in breeding wheat for rust resistance

Journal Club will be starting up again on January 28th! Join us as Nathaniel Schlief covers the paper Applications of machine learning methods to genomic selection in breeding wheat for rust resistance. No one approach is appropriate for all data sets with genomic selection being no exception. Couched in the example of rust resistance in wheat, González-Camacho et al. explores machine learning algorithms as they apply to genomic selection. They provide a thorough introduction into machine learning and then demonstrate that in the case of rust resistance, which is controlled in an additive fashion and it’s measurement is generally finite and discrete, machine learning may be a “valuable alternative” to parametric models. Additionally, they discuss the application of machine learning on other traits such as days to heading and how those methods can overcome the inherent statistical structure of the trait.